Peppers for Papa: Growing Serrano del Sol Hybrid Peppers in Pots


“Is the serrano del sol hybrid suitable for growing in a container (in Roanoke, Virginia)?  Each year I help my grandchildren plant tomatoes (for Mama) and hot peppers (for Daddy) in containers.  ~Carol”

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Hi Cosetta,

Thank you for the email regarding Serrano del Sol Hybrid Peppers.  Yes, they are a great variety for growing in pots!

Growing peppers in containers is easy, and most (if not all) peppers will thrive.  In fact, some were selected for their ability to grow well in a pot!  Let’s look at some things to consider when growing your peppers in a container.

It’s not so much a problem with the pot being too big, but rather don’t go choosing one ortoo small.  Although many peppers don’t grow more than 20″ tall, they still need enough room for their roots to spread out.

For the smaller peppers (under 12″ tall), you’ll need a 2 gallon container.  For the larger pepper plants, a 5 gallon or even 10 gallon container will give the peppers plenty of room to grow.

Oh, and remember — your container needs to have drainage holes, so excess water has a way to escape.

I prefer to use bagged soil, seeing as the soil in my yard is fairly sandy.  I like a mixture of composted cow manure and organic potting soil.  The composted cow manure feeds the plants, and the organic potting soil lets the plant’s roots grow freely.  I generally use in a 50/50 ratio (just as much composted cow manure as potting soil).

I generally avoid any potting soil labeled as “african violet” or “houseplant” or any such designation.  I also like to avoid pre-fertilized potting soil.  If you can’t find any “regular” potting soil, try using sphagnum moss instead, at a ration of 40/60 (40% sphagnum and 60% composted cow manure).

If you have access to real compost (meaning, from your own compost pile), by all means use that!  Just make sure it’s fully “cooked” to destroy any lingering unfriendly bacteria or fungi.

Your pepper plants will very likely need more frequent watering when being grown in a container, as well as more frequent fertilizing.

Watering should be done whenever you can stick your finger 1 inch into the soil and it’s dry (the tried and true method).  Soon enough, you’ll get to recognize whether that means watering every day, every other day, etc. for your particular growing conditions.

I like to use my fertilizer at no more than 1/2 strength, but I fertilize a little more often — usually once every other week.  When your pepper is first growing, it needs a fair amount of nitrogen, but once it starts producing flowers, it needs more phosphorus.  I prefer doing things as organically as possible, so I like worm castings, fish emulsion, and seaweed extract.

If I feel the plant needs a little boost of nitrogen or phosphorus (beyond the normal fertilizing), I’ll add in some blood meal (nitrogen) or bone meal (phosphorus).  Both can be found in most garden centers.

I am debating adding an organic tomato fertilizer to this mix — after all, tomatoes and peppers are related and have similar requirements.

Some peppers may need to be staked or caged due to their growing habits.  I usually find that bell peppers need to be staked, due to fruit weight.  Large plants like serranos may need to be caged if they start overtaking your container gardening area.

Ultimately, it’s up to you, especially since there are now peppers like Mohawk  that are more of a draping/hanging pepper, instead of upright.

Please keep in mind that if you decide to grow the really, really hot chile peppers (like scotch bonnet, habaneros, etc.), please don’t do it around small children or pets.  Just touching the fruit of these plants can cause severe irritation and burning.

I also would recommend staking or at least caging such chile peppers, if they are in an area where people will potentially be walking near them.  All you need to do is brush by the peppers to get the oil on your clothes/body.

And remember, when staking or caging the extra-hot chile peppers, please use rubber gloves — preferably the disposable kind.  That’s a lesson I had to learn the hard way.  (And naturally, also use the rubber gloves when harvesting the peppers.)

That’s pretty much all you need to know about growing peppers in containers.  This means that even if you don’t have a yard, you can have garden-fresh peppers.  Just make sure that the spot where you plan to put the pots gets at least 8 hours of sun a day, and is in a warm spot (peppers like heat).

 

 

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© Mertie Mae Botanics LLC and Horticulture Talk!, 2011. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Mertie Mae Botanics LLC and Horticulture Talk! with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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