Archive | May 2017

Wal-Mart is Not Your Garden’s Friend: Iris in May?


Horticultural Warning: For those that may be interested in buying bulbs at Wal-mart…

While in the Plover, WI Wal-mart on Monday with my Mom, we happened to stroll down the aisle where they had bulbs/tubers/rhizomes — glads, canna, iris, etc. Among the selection of about 10 iris varieties were 2 Dutch Iris — “Miss Saigon” and “Eye of the Tiger”.

20170506_142747Miss Saigon

My first reaction at seeing any iris – Dutch, Siberian, Bearded, or otherwise – is that this is NOT the time of year to plant iris. You plant them in the late summer/early autumn.

Dutch Iris do not grow in Wisconsin — they are for the southern states. Further research on my part shows that “Miss Saigon” is for Zones 8-11 and “Eye of the Tiger” for Zones 6-9. Wisconsin is mostly Zone 3 and 4 with a bit of 5 in the southeastern part. (NOTE: Plover is a 4.) Just like the short day onions I wrote about previously, Wal-Mart just throws whatever on the shelves because most gardeners that shop at Wal-Mart do not have enough knowledge to know that they are being taken. Just because you are getting a good deal at the checkout counter does not mean that you are getting what you think you are getting. And Wal-Mart is NOT the only offender — I have seen the same in years past at Sam’s Club, ShopKo, KMart, Menards, Home Depot, and other big box chains are notorious for selling things that they -say- grow in your area, but a quick variety search online shows how much they have lied to you. By buying products that are not for your area, you have just wasted your money on what will be an expensive annual, plus you will likely tell everyone you know that you have a “black thumb” when it comes to gardening.

Miss Saigon 2Eye of the Tiger

If you want something reliable that will truly grow well, spend the extra few cents/dollars and go to a reputable horticultural seller. If you need advise on where to go, send me a message and I can send you info.

Please feel free to share this post with your friends.

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© Mertie Mae Botanics LLC and Horticulture Talk!, 2017. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Mertie Mae Botanics LLC and Horticulture Talk! with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

Gardening Tips & Techniques for Herbs


Reposted with permission of the National Garden Bureau:

 

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Grow Your Own Herbs!

Herbs are any plants used for food, flavoring, medicine, or fragrances for their savory or aromatic qualities. We often refer to herbs as a gateway to gardening because of how easy most of them are to grow. So new gardeners can take delight in growing their first parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme! Experienced gardeners too may need a helpful tip now and then. Browse below on the herb of your choice then click through to read more. Follow our Pinterest board on herbs for even more useful ideas!

Basil (Ocimum basilicum) is a culinary herb of the family Lamiaceae. It is also called the “king of herbs” and the “royal herb” possibly because of the name’s meaning in Greek. Read more about growing basil.
Dill (Anethum graveolens), a member of the carrot family, and is valued both for its flavorful foliage and for its pungent seeds. As annuals, dill plants die each year, but their seeds can winter over in the soil to pop up the following year. Read more.
Chives (Allium schoenoprasum) come in several forms, but the most common one has roundish leaves that are used for their onion-like flavor. This perennial member of the onion family is hardy in Zones 3-10. Read more about chives here. 
Oregano (Origanum vulgare) and its cultivars are the most familiar forms of oregano. This is a perennial hardy to Zone 5 and blooms with rose, purple or white flowers making it usable as a groundcover. Read more.