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Wal-Mart is Not Your Garden’s Friend: Iris in May?


Horticultural Warning: For those that may be interested in buying bulbs at Wal-mart…

While in the Plover, WI Wal-mart on Monday with my Mom, we happened to stroll down the aisle where they had bulbs/tubers/rhizomes — glads, canna, iris, etc. Among the selection of about 10 iris varieties were 2 Dutch Iris — “Miss Saigon” and “Eye of the Tiger”.

20170506_142747Miss Saigon

My first reaction at seeing any iris – Dutch, Siberian, Bearded, or otherwise – is that this is NOT the time of year to plant iris. You plant them in the late summer/early autumn.

Dutch Iris do not grow in Wisconsin — they are for the southern states. Further research on my part shows that “Miss Saigon” is for Zones 8-11 and “Eye of the Tiger” for Zones 6-9. Wisconsin is mostly Zone 3 and 4 with a bit of 5 in the southeastern part. (NOTE: Plover is a 4.) Just like the short day onions I wrote about previously, Wal-Mart just throws whatever on the shelves because most gardeners that shop at Wal-Mart do not have enough knowledge to know that they are being taken. Just because you are getting a good deal at the checkout counter does not mean that you are getting what you think you are getting. And Wal-Mart is NOT the only offender — I have seen the same in years past at Sam’s Club, ShopKo, KMart, Menards, Home Depot, and other big box chains are notorious for selling things that they -say- grow in your area, but a quick variety search online shows how much they have lied to you. By buying products that are not for your area, you have just wasted your money on what will be an expensive annual, plus you will likely tell everyone you know that you have a “black thumb” when it comes to gardening.

Miss Saigon 2Eye of the Tiger

If you want something reliable that will truly grow well, spend the extra few cents/dollars and go to a reputable horticultural seller. If you need advise on where to go, send me a message and I can send you info.

Please feel free to share this post with your friends.

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© Mertie Mae Botanics LLC and Horticulture Talk!, 2017. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Mertie Mae Botanics LLC and Horticulture Talk! with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

Lickin’ the Cold of Winter with Garlic!


“Dear Miss Horticulturist,

A few weeks ago I purchased a large quantity of garlic from the grocery store.  I didn’t get all of it used in time and now it is sprouting.  Can I plant it and overwinter it?”

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Thanks for reading and for submitting your question.  Because WordPress doesn’t provide me with a ton of information, I’m going to guess that you purchased a California White garlic and that you live in an area that gets cold in winter.

The Good: Garlic can be planted any time during the year.  You are going to want to plant the cloves down about 6 inches.  It does take some time to come up,  so don’t give up on them!

The Bad: California White types do not overwinter in colder areas.  If you were to plant it at this time of year, it would grow up until winter, but not come back in spring.  They are what is known as a ‘softneck’ type.  For garlic that you want to overwinter, you should put in a hardneck variety in northern (wintery) climates.

The Ugly: Okay, there really is no ugly, but I just was in the mood to use that analogy.  =)  For future reference, if you are planting a hardneck variety, they should be put in the ground on October 12th.  That is ‘the day’ –although, I admit, I put mine in last year on a very warm day in November because I moved in late October last year.  The varieties I recommend are:

Musik:  A hardy, high-yielding hardneck porcelain variety out of Canada that grows well in northern climates. Very large bulbs yield 4 to 5 buff-colored cloves streaked with red. Good hot flavor. Easy to peel. Stores 6 months or more.

Inchellium Red:  One of the best flavored softneck artichoke garlics, the flavor mild and long-lasting with a hint of hotness that gets stronger in storage. Large off-white bulbs blushed pale purle at the base have 4 to 5 layers with 10 to 20 cloves per bulb. Stores for up to 9 months.  (Grows really well in Wisconsin.)

Italian Late, German Porcelian, Northern White, Siberian, Spanish Roja, and Purple Glazer.  I grew each of these this summer in my garden — and have found that no two varieties are alike.

Spring Garlic Varieties can be planted at the same time as onion sets in spring.  The ones I recommend are:

Late Italian: A softneck artichoke garlic with tight, light colored wrappers surrounding fat, round outer cloves. Has pleasing rich garlic flavor. Very productive. Keeps 6 to 9 months.

Silver Rose:  This softneck silverskin garlic makes beautiful braids with its rose colored cloves encased in smooth, bright white wrappers. Widely used by gourmet cooks who know and use garlic. Fast growing and stores up to 8 months.

California White:  An easy-to-grow strain acclimated to northern conditions. The large bulbs can be separated into cloves that are planted the same as onion sets. A bulb makes 10 to 20 cloves.

Elephant Garlic: Very mild flavor is ideal for soups, salads and sauce leaving no garlic aftertaste. Actually a member of the leek family. Mammoth bulbs weigh up to one pound or more, each with 5 to 7 huge cloves.  (Note from my garden: 2009 was the first time I grew these and I didn’t have much luck.  I’m not sure if it was our very cool summer or they just need something more than the other types of garlic, leeks, shallots, and onions I grew.  I need to do more hands on research with these. =)

 

© Mertie Mae Botanics LLC and Horticulture Talk!, 2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Mertie Mae Botanics LLC and Horticulture Talk! with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Unsized Seed, Checking Hot Peppers, Grafted Tomatoes, and Pellet Ingredients: Obscure Gardening Info


“Hello Mertie,

I like your writing style and your dry humor. You seem to know a lot about seeds and plants, so I have a few questions for you.

1. What is unsized seeds? I’ve seen this in carrots, cole crops, and lettuce.

2. What is checking on a pepper?

3. Are grafted tomato plants worth the extra money and fuss?

4. What is the pellet on a seed made from? Is it safe for my organic garden?

Thank you for all your great articles,

Joe”

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Hi Joe,

Thanks for your questions and kind comments.  As for your questions:

1.  Unsized seed means that the seed has not been graded to a certain size. You often will see this with corn and other crops that are planted with equipment. When machinery was first brought about, your planter had a plate on it that required a certain size of seed. If your seed was to large, it would not go through the plate and would jam things up. If it was too small, the seed went through the plate too quickly and the seed spacing would be off.  For the smaller seeds like carrots, cole crops, and lettuce, it just means that some of the seed will be larger than others.  It doesn’t meant that some of the seeds (larger) will be better than others (smaller), so there are no worries with buying unsized seed.

Planting Plates

2. Checking on a pepper is often seen on the –good– varieties of hot jalapeno peppers.  Checking can also be refered to as corking or cracking on peppers by gardeners, but the seed industry calls it checking and will often put the term in seed/plant descriptions.

Jalapenos naturally produce checks/corks/cracks in their skin. The characteristic checking which may appear undesirable (to gardening novices) when harvesting is nothing more than the fruit working towards maturity. When choosing jalapenos to harvest, note that the more mature fruits will have some checks around the stems. These checks should not be a cause for alarm as they are part of the fruit’s natural maturing process and any jalapenos with checking remain safe to eat, as the browned tissue of the fruit are not perforations but discolored, dried cells on the skin of the fruit.Jalapeno

Checking in the jalapeno skin can also be used to judge the heat of the fruit. Each jalapeno becomes hotter the longer it is allowed to mature. When the fruit is fully ripe, it is the hottest that the variety can produce. So, the more mature the jalapeno is, the more checks it has and the hotter the pepper will be. Chefs sometimes use the checking to determine which peppers have the greatest chance to be hot.

However, don’t be fooled into thinking that all jalapenos have checks. New hybrids that are being out on the market are being created to “look pretty” for the uninformed gardener.  Gardeners that don’t know much want a perfect green fruit, but then don’t understand why it is not hot. Well… they kind of go hand in hand…  =)

 

3.  Grafted tomatoes. Ha! To be honest, for most home gardeners, I don’t recommend them unless you have done your research and know that you really need them in your garden.Grafted Tomatoes

Grafted tomatoes (along with peppers, eggplants, and melons) started in the hydroponic industry to a.) reduce the amount of soil borne diseases, b.) reduce the need for crop rotation, and c.) increase the health and production of heirloom varieties. Soil borne diseases run rampant in hydroponic setups. And I am sure you are wondering why, as there is no soil. Well, 99.9% of soil borne diseases are caused by the presence of water at the wrong times.  Think of things like tomato blights: having wet leaves at night causes the blight, not the soil that it comes from.  Having a super-soil-borne-disease-resistant root stock allows for lower incidence of disease and less spraying.  This ties directly into crop rotation, as having issues with a disease in a particular hydroponic greenhouse results in the crop causing the issues to be moved to successive greenhouses (or other sections of the same greenhouse) over the next few years. If you are a smaller operation, you have to have numerous other crops (at least 3) to cycle with the disease causing crop so the same crop won’t be in the same place for at least 3 years.  Most often commercial growers graft the heirloom varieties to make them more tolerant of ‘unusual’ conditions. Most heirlooms were developed in someone’s backyard, where they were used to a nice breeze, good sun, and the occasional rain shower. Putting an heirloom into a hydroponic greenhouse is a shell shock to the plant. There are numerous ways for it to become diseased and the environment is starkly different than what it was originally adapted to.  Grafting an heirloom scion onto a disease resistant rootstock allows the plant to be less susceptable to disease and have a growth habit similar to a hybrid tomato. Also, heirlooms are said (by the industry) to produce less fruits per plant compared to hybrids (guess they never looked at the ones in my garden). Grafting increases the amount of fruits produced.  The extra cost of the graft is covered by the premium price that heirloom produce brings in.

So how does that translate to a home gardener?  If you have had problems with soil borne diseases in the past in your garden and it is not large enough to have a 4 year crop rotation or you grow only a couple plants, you may want to consider grafted vegetables. They are more expensive ($8-9 or more per plant), so you need to balance the cost with your gain. However, if you are someone that can rotate your crops, do not have severe disease issues, or you grow more than 2-3 tomato/pepper/etc. plants, I don’t recommend it. It’s just not worth it.  I don’t grow them in my garden and would never.

Also, from my experience, many home gardeners have had issues initially with the graft drying out if the plant is not kept well watered. With non-tomato grafted plants, the plant is completely dead.  With tomatoes, the scion of the plant dies and the rootstock may begin to grow.  If you are not keeping a close eye on your plants, you likely won’t notice it until your plant produces fruits and the fruit is not the variety you bought.

4.  Seed pellets are made of clay with a colorant painted on the outside. They are generally considered safe for home organic gardens. If you are an organic farmer, they are allowed only if the company you are purchasing the seed from does not offer the seed raw (unpelleted).Seed Pellets

I hope this information helps you out. If you have any other questions, please feel free to ask!

Seed Savers Exchange Just Got a Bit Cooler…


Today I was reading the various posts on my Facebook page, and one from SSE caught my eye:

We are beyond excited to introduce our NEW Online Seed Exchange, the ultimate resource for all you diversity-loving gardeners out there. Since 1975 our members have been sharing thousands of seeds every year in the seed exchange, and this new online resource is the next step for keeping diversity in the hands of many: http://blog.seedsavers.org/online-seed-exchange/
We are beyond excited to introduce our NEW Online Seed Exchange, the ultimate resource for all you diversity-loving gardeners out there. Since 1975 our members have been sharing thousands of seeds every year in the seed exchange, and this new online resource is the next step for keeping diversity in the hands of many: http://blog.seedsavers.org/online-seed-exchange/
YES! YES! YES, YES, YES!
Back in the day and age when I was employed at a seed company, our seed buyer received a copy of the Yearbook. Our company was not part of the membership, and no one there was interested in it… except me.  Between the yearbook and the Seed Inventory book, I could be content for hours.
While this website only allows members to purchase seed, it is fun to look at for non-members too. It is amazing how many different varieties there are out there!

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© Mertie Mae Botanics LLC and Horticulture Talk!, 2013. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Mertie Mae Botanics LLC and Horticulture Talk! with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Content from Seed Savers Exchange from their Facebook page.

New Variety: Begonia ‘Santa Cruz Sunset’


Begonia ‘Santa Cruz Sunset’ (Begonia boliviensis) is super heat tolerant! It thrives in well drained soil and can handle moderate drought once it is established. Fiery red-orange blooms cover the plant from late spring until frost. The well branched plant looks full and lush in a pot or hanging basket by itself or in a garden with a rainbow of other colors.

Primary Details

Class: Begonia
Variety Name: ‘Santa Cruz Sunset’
Genus: Begonia
Species: boliviensis
Year: 2012
Member: Ernst Benary of America Inc.
Sales Type: Flowers

Plant Needs

Duration Type: Annual
Light Needs: Full sun, Partial sun
Water Needs: Dry to Normal
Dead Heading Recommended: NO
Staking Required: NO

Plant Characteristics

Foliage Color: Dark green
Plant Habit: Bushy, Mounded, Trailing
Plant Height: Medium: 10″ to 24″
Garden Spacing: 12″
Bloom Time: Late Spring, Summer, Fall, Summer to Frost
Bloom Color: Red, Orange
Bloom Color Pattern: Solid
Bloom Size: 2-3″
Fragrance: None
Weather Tolerance: Drought, Heat, Rain

Home Gardener Use

Container: YES
Hanging Basket: YES
Medium Height Divider: YES

How to Grow

Although Begonia ‘Santa Cruz Sunset’ is from seed, it can be tricky for a home gardener to grow it from a seed. It should should be purchased as a starter plant and planted in full sun in a well drained soil. For best performance use a well-balanced fertilizer once or twice a month. Allow the plant to dry out slightly between waterings. The roots are very sensitive to excess moisture, so do not let them sit in water.

Troubleshooting tips:

If your soil has a pH of 6.5 or higher, it can cause the leaves to become yellow. Adding a soil amendment to lower the pH will return the leaves to a healthy looking green.

This type of begonia requires “long days” (more than 14 hours of light) to initiate buds. This means that if you take it indoors in the fall to enjoy it as a house plant, it will probably go out of bloom for most of the winter.

In areas that experience long-term extreme heat it is best to move the plant to a shadier location.

Never water plants at mid-day. The water is not absobed as well by the plant and it can cause scorching of the leaves. It is best to water early in the morning or at least 2 hours before sunset.

Begonia ‘Santa Cruz Sunset’ is offered by Benary Seeds of Watsonville, CA.

 

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© Mertie Mae Botanics LLC and Horticulture Talk!, 2012. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Mertie Mae Botanics LLC and Horticulture Talk! with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Got Prickles? A Closer Look at Prime Blackberries


“Dear Horticulture Talk,

Thanks for being such a great blog.  I really enjoy your articles.  I was wondering you could help me out on a question.  I see that a lot of the seed catalogs are offering an everbearing set of blackberries.  Some have Ark, Jim, and Jan.  The descriptions sound nice, but do you know if they are thornless.  We’ve tried thornless blackberreis in the past, but the deer eat them down to the ground.  I’m hoping they aren’t because I love blackberries and havign them all the time would be nice.  Is there anything else that makes them different to grow?  I know you grow June and Everbearing strawberries different.  Is it like that with blackberries?  Do you have more info than the little paragraph that they have in the catalogs, because each catalog has just about the same paragraph?

Thank you for your thoughts and I’m happy to be one of your fans.

Sincerely,

Buddy Miller

Waupaca, WI”

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Hi Buddy,

Thank you for your kind comments.  I’m glad to know that there is at least one fan out there.  Woot!  Okay, just kidding, but all the same it is good to know that people are doing more than just glancing once at my blog.

The Prime® Everbearing Blackberries Series (Rubus fruticosus) are definitely something to get excited about.  As a kid, I remember blackberry picking quite fondly.  About 1 1/4 miles from home was the homesite of my great aunt and uncle.  Back in the 1910s-1960s, the homesite had been a prosperous farm.  My great aunt and uncle were never blessed with any children, so after they passed away the land was sold to a gentleman that owned much of the land around and had it set up as tree farms.  The back pastures were put into trees and the buildings, small woods around them, and a large ‘bowl’/kettle were left to go wild.  The tree farm land bordered my parent’s land, and as they knew the gentleman, we were granted permission to cross country ski, hunt, or do pretty much whatever we wanted on the land.  The large bowl provided lots of winter sledding memories, the buildings were always great for pictures or maybe digging up a sprig of an old perennial that still grew in my great aunt’s old flowerbeds, and the woods… well, the woods were FULL of blackberries.  The places was famous in the area as everyone and their brother went there to pick berries.  While many probably did not have permission to be there, it was okay because there were more than enough berries to go around.  Unfortunately, the gentleman got a bit greedy in the late 90s and took out the buildings and woods/berries and put more trees in there too.  As of the past summer, though, the blackberries have come back enough to be a force to be reckoned with in the trees!

But, I digress.  Let’s get back to the Primes®!

There are three types of Prime® Blackberries: Prime-Ark® 45, Prime Jim®, and Prime Jan®.  To break them down into a bit more detail:

–Prime-Ark® 45:  

Type – Primocane-fruiting; thorny, erect.

Date of Release – 2009; Plant Patent Applied For

Fruit Size – Fruits of Prime-Ark®45 are medium-large, averaging 6 g or more in most trials measuring floricane fruits in Arkansas. In trials in Oregon and California, primocane fruits were just over 7 grams and near 9 grams, respectively. In Arkansas, primocane fruits are smaller, usually 4 to 5 grams.

Flavor/Sweetness – Average soluble solids (a measurement of sweetness) of Prime-Ark® 45 was near 10%, just under that of Ouachita. In additional measurements in other plantings and years, soluble solids of 10 to 11% have been measured on floricane fruits of Prime-Ark® 45. Primocane fruit soluble solids levels have achieved 12%. Overall fruit flavor ratings for Prime-Ark® 45 were higher than the previous primocane-fruiting releases, and were near that of Ouachita.

Yield – Fruit yields have been very good in trials of Prime-Ark® 45. Most of the yield evaluation in Arkansas has been done on floricanes, and in research trials, floricane yields of Prime-Ark® 45 exceeded Prime-Jim® and were comparable to thornless, floricane-fruiting varieties. For primocane yields, data from Arkansas showed higher yields for Prime-Ark® 45 compared to Prime-Jim®. In observational plots in California and Oregon, primocane yields were very good.

Maturity Date – Floricane first harvest date for Prime-Ark® 45 is June 9 in Arkansas, 4 days after Prime-Jim® and Natchez and 4 days before Ouachita. Primocane first bloom date for Prime-Ark® 45 is usually about 2 weeks later than that for Prime-Jan® and Prime-Jim® Likewise, primocane fruit ripens 2-3 weeks later for Prime-Ark® 45 compared to Prime-Jan® and Prime-Jim®, averaging August 8. In California, ripening of primocane fruit was in late August and in Oregon was mid September. This later primocane fruit ripening date should be noted as the harvest date may be an issue in northern areas to complete the fruit ripening period. Likewise this later ripening date could be a major asset for production in areas where later fruiting is desired.

Disease Resistance – No orange rust observed and only slight anthracnose observed. No information available concerning resistance to double blossom/rosette.

Comments – Prime-Ark® 45 is primarily intended to provide a high quality berry with excellent postharvest handling to allow production of berries for local and shipping markets in the late summer to fall fruiting season in areas where it is adapted. Summer temperatures above 85oF can reduce fruit set and quality on primocanes. Performance of Prime-Ark® 45 in primocane fruiting has exceeded that of Prime-Jim® and Prime-Jan® in Arkansas, and may offer enhanced adaptation to higher heat conditions. However, only trial plantings are recommended to determine full adaptation to specific locations.

–Prime-Jim®:  

Type – Primocane-fruiting; thorny, erect.

Date of Release – 2004; plant patent #16989.

Fruit Size – Floricane fruit average 5 g; primocane fruit vary by location grown, from 3 to 10 g in various trials.

Flavor/Sweetness – Good, similar to other thorny varieties; soluble solids (percent sugar) averages 8%.

Yield –  Floricane yields comparable to floricane-fruiting thorny and thornless varieties such as Apache and Ouachita; exceeds Arapaho in floricane yield. Primocane yields vary greatly by location, from very high in the Willamette Valley of Oregon to very low at Hope, Arkansas.

Maturity Date – Floricane fruit ripens beginning approximately June 3 at Clarksville, Arkansas, and fruiting extends for about four weeks. Floricane ripening season is near that of Arapaho. Primocane fruit begins ripening approximately July 17 at Clarksville and Sept. 1 in Oregon. Primocane fruiting can continue until frost depending on summer and fall temperatures. Fruit development to maturity may not be completed in more northern areas of the U.S.

Disease Resistance – Floricanes susceptible to double blossom/rosette, but primocanes avoid this disease since the disease does not appear until the second season on the canes. No orange rust observed and only slight anthracnose observed.

Comments – Recommended only for home garden use and very limited commercial trial. Not recommended for storage nor shipping. Hardiness similar to other Arkansas thorny varieties. Summer temperatures above 85F can greatly reduce fruit set, size and quality on primocanes; this results in substantial reductions in yield and quality of fruits in areas with this temperature range in late summer and fall. Seed size small, ave. 2.1 mg/seed.

–Prime-Jan®:  

Type – Primocane-fruiting; thorny, erect.

Date of Release – 2004; plant patent #15,788.

Fruit Size – Floricane fruit average 5 g; primocane fruit vary by location grown, from 3 to 15 g in various trials.

Flavor/Sweetness – Good, similar to other thorny varieties; soluble solids (percent sugar) averages 9.6%.

Yield –  Floricane yields comparable to floricane-fruting thorny and thornless varieties such as Apache and Ouachita; usually exceeds Arapaho in floricane yield. Primocane yields vary greatly by location, from very high in the Willamette Valley of Oregon to very low at Hope, Arkansas.

Maturity Date – Floricane fruit ripens beginning approximately June 8 at Clarksville, Arkansas, and fruiting extends for about four weeks. Floricane ripening season begins just after that of Arapaho. Primocane fruit begins ripening approximately July 18 at Clarksville and Sept. 1 in Oregon. Primocane fruiting can continue until frost depending on summer and fall temperatures. Fruit development to maturity may not be completed in more northern areas of the U.S.

Disease Resistance – Floricanes susceptible to double blossom/rosette, but primocanes avoid this disease since the disease does not appear until the second season on the canes. No orange rust observed and only slight anthracnose observed.

Comments – Recommended only for home garden use and very limited commercial trial. Not recommended for storage nor shipping. Hardiness similar to Choctaw and Arapaho, but has shown some late winter cane injury in some years. Summer temperatures above 85F can greatly reduce fruit set, size and quality on primocanes; this results in substantial reductions in yield and quality of fruits in areas with this temperature range in late summer and fall.

So, no matter which variety you choose, those deer better be on the look out or else they are going to have a very sore mouth!

I hope this information helps you out, and again, thanks for reading!

*** Information provided in this article comes from Randy at AgriStarts of Apopka, FL and from the University of Arkansas Extension.  To get more information on any of the Prime® Blackberries, please check out their website at www.agristarts.com and http://www.aragriculture.org, respectively.

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© Mertie Mae Botanics LLC and Horticulture Talk!, 2012. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Mertie Mae Botanics LLC and Horticulture Talk! with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Introducing Tomato ‘Lizzano’ F1, AAS Vegetable Award Winner


(Posted with permission of All American Selections)

Our final new AAS Introduction is Lizzano F1 Hybrid Tomato.

‘Lizzano’ is a vigorous semi-determinate tomato variety with a low growing, trailing habit excellent for growing in patio containers or hanging baskets. In the garden, some staking will benefit this plant despite a nice compact and uniform growth habit. The durable, appealing plants grow 16 to 20 inches tall with a compact spread of only 20 inches. Expect abundant yields of high-quality, bright red, baby cherry sized fruits. The small 1-inch fruits weigh about 0.4 ounces. The plentiful fruit set allows for continual harvest beneficial for the home gardener. Judges noted better eating quality, yield and plant habit than comparisons. ‘Lizzano’ is the first Late Blight tolerant cherry fruited semi-determinate variety on the market. Disease resistant plants will last later into the growing season. Harvest begins 105 days from sowing seed or 63 days from transplant. Bred by Pro-Veg Seeds Ltd.

AAS® Winner Data
Genus species: Solanum Lycopersicum
Unique qualities: First Late Blight tolerant cherry fruited semi-determinate variety on the market
Fruit size: 0.4 ounces
Fruit color: Red
Plant type: Semi-determinate small cherry, compact bush, trailing habit
Plant height: 16 to 20 inches
Plant width: 20 inches
Garden location: Full sun
Garden spacing: 20 inches apart
Disease tolerances: Late Blight tolerant
Length of time to harvest: 63 days from transplant
Closest comparisons on market: ‘Tumbler’ and ‘Tumbling Tom Red’

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© Mertie Mae Botanics LLC and Horticulture Talk!, 2011. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Mertie Mae Botanics LLC and Horticulture Talk! with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.