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The Catalog: Mertie Mae Seeds 2014


Over 30 varieties of organically grown, heirloom tomato and tomatillo seeds to chose from. Which will you pick?  See more on our Etsy site!

 

Vera Vera 3 Vera 2 Toma Verde Tomatillo Toma Verde Tomatillo 2 Stupice Speckled Roman Snowberry Red Zebra Red Fig Red Currant Purple Tomatillo Purple Russian Porter Pink Brandywine Nebraska Wedding Nebraska Wedding 2 Napoli Napoli 2 MExican Midget Lillian's Yellow Heirloom Gold Currant German Johnson Pink Christmas Grape Chocolate Cherry Bulgarian Triumph Brown Berry Brandywine Black Sea Man Black from Tula siberian Black Brandywine Bella Rosa Hard Rock Aunt Ruby's German Green Alaskan Fancy Anna Russian Amish Paste Amana Orange Alaskan Fancy Abe Lincoln Original

Who Owns Who? Devotees of the Great Monsanto


For those that frequently read my blog, I think it comes through very loud and clear where I stand on my perspectives with Monsanto. While I will not fully type out my exact words of what I think, let’s just say that there is no grey for me. With the statements I have publicly made in the past, I will likely find myself dead in a ditch someday or in jail for not stroking the fur of Monsanto’s hairy back just the right way.

Recently I was asked by a online gardening friend where they could go to buy seeds if they wanted to avoid Monsanto. Well, of course, the obvious places would be Baker Creek, Seed Savers Exchange, etc. and so on. “But what companies should I avoid? I don’t want to accidentally support someone that even agrees with their practices.” What,  not want to agree with the folks that think that they own every seed in the world and you are wrong to think otherwise?

Back in 2005, people were shocked when Monsanto purchased Seminis.  At that time, Seminis controled 40% of the U.S. vegetable seed market and 20% of the world market. If you do the math, this means that they supplied approximately 56% of the lettuce, 75% of the tomatoes, and 85% of the peppers that finds it’s way to your supermarket shelf.  If that’s not scary, consider also that about half of the beans, cucumbers, squash, melons, broccoli, cabbage, spinach and peas you buy at the store comes from them too. The company’s biggest revenue source comes from tomato and peppers seeds, followed by cucumbers and beans.

In large part, these numbers reflect usage of Seminis varieties within large industrial production geared towards supermarkets, but Seminis seeds are also widely used by regional conventional and organic farmers as well as market and home gardeners. J.W. Jung, HPS, Vermont Bean Seed, Totally Tomatoes, R.H.Shumway’s, Nichol’s, Rupp, Osborne, Snow, and Stokes are among the dozens of commercial and garden seed catalogs that carry the more than 3,500 varieties that comprise Seminis’ offerings. This includes dozens of All-American Selections and an increasing number of varieties licensed to third parties for certified organic seed production.

Scary, huh?

OWNED BY MONSANTO OR SEMINIS

Asgrow
Channel
DeKalb
DeltaPine
FonTanelle
Gold Country Seed
Hubner Seed
Jung Seed Genetics
Kruger Seeds
Lewis Hybrids
Rea Hybrids
Specialty
Stewart
Stone Seed Group
West Bred

FOOD PRODUCERS WITH CONTRACTS FOR EXCLUSIVE USE OF MONSANTO SEED

(Image used with permission of http://www.realfarmacy.com.)

SELL VARIOUS PERCENTAGES OF SEEDS FROM MONSANTO OR SEMINIS.

Per contractual agreements with these companies, Monsanto may also dictate the location of their product’s within the purchaser’s website and/or catalog.  You can see more about this in my previous article on the subject.)

Audubon Workshop
Breck’s Bulbs
Cook’s Garden
Dege Garden Center
Earl May Seed
E & R Seed Co
Ferry Morse
Flower of the Month Club
Gardens Alive
Germania Seed Co
Garden Trends
HPS
J.W. Jung Seed
Lindenberg Seeds
McClure and Zimmerman Quality Bulb Brokers
Mountain Valley Seed
Nichol’s
Osborne
Park Bulbs
Park’s Countryside Garden
Plants of Distinction
R.H. Shumway
Roots and Rhizomes
Rupp
Seeds for the World
Seymour’s Selected Seeds
Snow
Spring Hill Nurseries
Stokes
T&T Seeds
Tomato Growers Supply
Totally Tomato
Vermont Bean Seed Co.
Wayside Gardens
Willhite Seed Co.
American Seeds
Campbell
De Ruiter
Diener Seeds
Fielder’s Choice
Hawkeye
Heartland
Heritage Seeds
Holdens
icorn
Peotec
Poloni
Trelay
Western Seeds

 

If you are thinking now, “where can I buy seed from?”, here is a list of Non-GMO, Monsanto-free seed companies.
Amishland Seeds
Annapolis Valley
Baker Creek Heirloom Seeds 
Burpee Seeds
Heritage Seed Company (Nova Scotia, Canada)
Diane’s Flower Seeds
Ed Hume Seeds
Fedco
Garden City Seeds
Heirlooms Evermore Seeds
Heirloom Seeds
Heirloom Organics
Horizon Herbs
Irish-Eyes
Irish Valley Seeds
Johnny’s Seeds
Landreth Seeds
Lake Valley Seeds
Livingston Seeds
Local Harvest
Mountain Rose Herbs
Organica Seed
Park Seeds
Pinetree
Sand Hill Preservation Center
Seeds of Change (Owned by Mars Inc.) But GMO Free.
Seed Savers Exchange
Southern Exposure
Sustainable Seed Co
Territorial Seeds
Tiny Seeds
Uprising Seeds
Virtual Farm Seed Co
Wildseed Farms

There you go folks! Enjoy!!

(P.S. If you are a seed company representative for a Non-GMO/non-Monsanto company, please feel free to comment below and we will add your company to the list!)

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© Mertie Mae Botanics LLC and Horticulture Talk!, 2013. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Mertie Mae Botanics LLC and Horticulture Talk! with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Got Late Blight Tomatoes? Then You Need Ferline F1!


For a long time, many gardeners have been looking for an answer to their late blight (Phytophthora infestans)  on tomato questions.  Now we have that answer:  Ferline F1 Hybrid.

A remarkable tomato variety has impressive late blight tolerance in a garden situation when grown in a number of different trials. Ferline could be the answer to many gardeners’ prayers, to help overcome this most destructive disease. The vigorous, indeterminate plants produce heavy crops of deep red fruits of up to 5 ounces in weight with a very good flavour. Suitable for growing under glass. Also resistant to fusarium and verticillium wilt.

In my own personal experience growing these, I have found that you need to provide adequate support and tie in regularly. Remove all side shoots as they appear and restrict the plant to one main stem. Feed weekly with a high Potash Liquid fertiliser and water only moderately.

Remember, although Ferline F1 Hybrid shows resistance to Late Blight, it is not 100% resistant.  I know, you are saying, “Huh?!?!”  Like humans, resistance is good to a point.  Let’s say that you received a vaccine for a disease along with a million other people.  Likely, a few of that million will get the disease because of other circumstances — being immunocompromised, not eating properly, etc.  Tomatoes are just the same: if they are not healthy and happy, even a resistant variety can get sick.  To ensure that your resistant variety is growing well, remember to follow these simple steps:

1.  Rotate your Solanacious crops.  This means that a particular area of your garden should have tomato/potato/eggplant/pepper/tobacco/petunia/huckleberry/ground cherry/tomatillo/etc. grown it only once in every 3-4 years.

2.  Stake your tomatoes.  Allowing the plants to be up in the air will increase circulation and minimize the wet conditions for disease initiation.

3.  Do not water after 4 p.m.  You want to have your plants be as dry as possible going into the overnight hours.  If it is necessary to water after this time, do so only by soaker hoses.

4.  Remove bad fruit or tissues as soon as you see them.  Letting things rot on the vine is never a good thing.

5.  At the end of the season, clean your garden up properly.  Remove every stem, leaf, or fruit and toss it in the garbage (not the compost).  This will ensure that there is absolutely no way you can ever reinfect your garden with disease.

6.  And last, but not least, purchase your seed from a reputable, certified dealer.  There are a LOT of seed sellers out there that say they *know* their seed is safe because they [insert what they say they did].  However, many can say they did something, and they actually didn’t.  Buy your seed from a certified dealer — they have to by law do tests on their seed (and if they didn’t, you would not be buying from them because they would be in jail).  If you are interested in purchasing this variety, allow me to recommend this company:  http://www.totallytomato.com/dp.asp?pID=00263&c=43&p=Ferline+Hybrid+Tomato

EDIT, 1/22/11:  In addition to Ferline, the All-America Selections has released Lizzano F1 Hybrid Tomato, a cherry-type tomato that is resistant to Phytophthora infestans (Late Blight).  To see more information about Lizzano, click here.

 

 

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© Mertie Mae Botanics LLC and Horticulture Talk!, 2011. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Mertie Mae Botanics LLC and Horticulture Talk! with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

New from HPS: Pear Goliath Hybrid VFF Tomato


For those of you that really like to garden, I recommend the HPS  catalog.  HPS stands for Horticultural Product and Services.  Whether you are a small commercial grower or a home gardener, the HPS catalog is one-stop source for premium products at discounted prices.  They offer a wide selection of vegetables and one of the best selections of flowers in the USA.  As their catalog says, “Value is more important than ever these days…”

The other great thing about HPS is that their 2010 catalog is already out!  I like to look upon it as that one present you get to open before Christmas!

Anyway, back to today’s featured variety: Pear Goliath Hybrid VFF Tomato.

(Image courtesy of http://www.hpsseed.com/products/00012.jpg)

“90 days.  Large, blocky fruits weigh in at an impressive 5 to 8 oz. — the largest saladette we’ve seen yet!  Firm, meaty, and 3 to 4″ in length with good flavor.  Great when sliced for hamburgers, diced for salsa, cooking and roasting.  High yielding, bushy plant habit.  Disease resistant.  Determinate.”

Before the devastation of what will now be referred to as the ‘2009 Late Blight Infestation to End All Infestions’ , my Pear Goliaths were looking (and tasting) great!  I had only two tomatoes from these before everything was wiped out, but they were spectacular! Mine were used to make BLTs.  In the past, I have had problems with tomatoes that are a bit juicier and get the bread soggy.  The Pear Goliaths held up well — no sogginess, but still juicy enough to be just right for the sandwich.  My hope was to make some salsa out of these too, but unfortunately that never came to be.

In addition to HPS, Pear Goliath is also available from Totally Tomatoes (introduced in 2009).  It can be found at:

http://www.hpsseed.com/dp.asp?c=327&p={BAC78099-9F04-4B95-8732-F620314A2358}

or:

http://www.totallytomato.com/dp.asp?P={DF5EE05F-AEB7-4995-A7D0-47B81DC33682}

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© Mertie Mae Botanics LLC and Horticulture Talk!, 2009. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Mertie Mae Botanics LLC and Horticulture Talk! with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

New for 2010 Posts


As a new little thing, I have decided to start highlighting some of the really cool new varieties that are coming out for 2010.  The ones that I will be highlighting are those that either I or my friends have been trialling during the 2009 growing season.

In addition to the usual information on growth habit and such, there will also be inclusions of recipes or other little information as appropriate.

I hope you guys enjoy the information!

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© Mertie Mae Botanics LLC and Horticulture Talk!, 2009. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Mertie Mae Botanics LLC and Horticulture Talk! with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Notes from the Trial Gardens: Tuesday, July 21st, 2009


–The second crop of  _____ Radish that we are trialing was finished off today.  If all goes well, my plan is to put in some of our current favorite varieties to examine late summer stresses.  Will probably plant German Giant, White Icicle, French Breakfast, and others.  Also have a yellow radish that I’m interested in trying.  Oooo, and it is time to get those winter radishes like April Cross (Daikon), Black Spanish,  and Watermelon/Red Meat in.

–Despite Mother Nature sending us a unseasonably cool summer, the bush snap and wax beans are finally ready to pick for the first time.

–The cool weather has also stunted the summer squashes and zucchinis.  The plants have been pampered and yet are barely a foot tall and trying to flower.  Those flowers just happened to disappear because someone is hoping that we will get some heat and finally make all that water and fertilizer work!  No names as to who has been picking off the flowers…

–The tomatoes continue to go to town on setting!  Can’t wait until we get some ripe fruits!

–A new addition (at least for me) is our Double Click Cosmos.  I have been eagerly anticipating their blooming, and today was not disappointed.  The first has opened and was a pink one.  Beautiful!

–Sunflowers continue to be a bit on the short side, but given this summer, I’m not surprised.

 

© Mertie Mae Botanics LLC and Horticulture Talk!, 2009. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Mertie Mae Botanics LLC and Horticulture Talk! with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.